REI Passage 65 Backpack Review

Hey everyone! I’ve been pretty busy this semester, but I wanted to share this review with you. Hope you enjoy it!

By now, I’ve had the REI Passage 65 Backpack for 4 years, and have used it on quite a few backpacking trips. It has held up very well, is still in very good condition, and I’ve never had any problems with the pack on any of my trips. In this post I’ll review and discuss the different components of the backpack.

The backpack’s shoulder straps, hipbelt, and back padding are simple, but are well designed and very comfortable even if you are carrying heavy loads. The mesh on the back is somewhat breathable, however it doesn’t really allow air to circulate like the backings of some of the other backpacks on the market, such as the Osprey Aether 60 Pack. The shoulder straps and hipbelt are also extendable to accommodate growth, which extends the life of the pack for younger kids and teenagers. The back padding is adjustable to accommodate torso lengths of 15-19 inches.

The backpack’s top-loading main compartment, sleeping bad compartment, and two zip pockets make it very easy to organize gear. In total the backpack has a gear capacity of 65 liters. I’ve found that the main compartment has enough room to hold and organize the majority of my gear, and the zip access on the side lets me access items buried in the main compartment without unloading the whole pack. Even for my five-day backpacking trip, I was able to easily fit everything inside the bag and didn’t have to clip anything to the external daisy chains. If you don’t want to use the sleeping bag compartment, there’s a divider that can be unzipped to increase the space in the main compartment. For smaller items, I always use what REI aptly calls the “front essential zip pocket”. For the most part, I use it for items I may need to access quickly, like the 10 essentials.

The floating lid on the backpack is very useful and can even be detached and used as a lumbar pack. I often use the zip pocket on the lid to store snacks or a camera, so that when I set my pack down they are easily accessible. In addition to this, the lid’s connecting straps are extendable to accommodate a larger load in the main compartment.

The two mesh water bottle holders on the sides of the pack are large enough to hold 1-liter sized bottles, but they aren’t tall enough to hold the bottles in securely. I had a “fun” experience in which my water bottle fell out as I was crossing a river, but after a mad dash down the bank, I was able to snag it with a branch. If you’re not hoping for a similar exciting experience, I’d recommend passing the side compression strap around the bottle to better secure it.

Some other useful components of the REI Passage 65 Backpack include sleeping pad straps on the underside of the pack, elastic cord crisscrossing the front of the pack (which can be used to hold a jacket in place on the outside of the pack), ice axe loops, side compression straps, and water-repellent zippers. The water-repellent zippers were a lifesaver when they saved my gear from getting wet in Washington when it started raining and my backpack cover seemed to have suddenly disappeared.

As a simple backpack that’s great for scouts, teenagers, and older kids, the Passage 65 Backpack does its job well. It was just as comfortable to wear on an overnight backpacking trip in the desert as it was on a five-day trip in Mt. Rainier National Park. I’d highly recommend this backpack for scouts and older children. It’s relatively cheap, very durable, and the option to extend the shoulder straps and hipbelt allows the backpack to be used by children even as they continue to grow.

Good luck finding an awesome backpack and I hope I was able to help!

Advertisements